ĐỀ THI IELTS READING VÀ ĐÁP ÁN - Tea and the Industrial Revolution

Tea and the Industrial Revolution

A Cambridge professor says that a change in drinking habits was the reason for the Industrial Revolution in Britain. Anjana Abuja reports.

A. Alan Macfarlane, professor of anthropological science at King’s College, Cambridge has, like other historians, spent decades wrestling with the enigma

Thumbnail

ĐỀ THI IELTS READING VÀ ĐÁP ÁN - Tea and the Industrial Revolution

Native Speaker - Trung tâm tiếng Anh 1 kèm 1 online qua Skype xin giới thiệu đến các bạn đề thi Ielts với tựa đề " Tea and the Industrial Revolution" thuộc chủ đề công nghiệp. Native Speaker hi vọng cung cấp cho bạn thật nhiều đề luyện thi ielts reading nhằm giúp các bạn luyện tập kỹ năng đọc các vấn đề học thuật như khoa học, báo chí, thiên văn, địa lý. Chúc các bạn kiên nhẫn luyện tập lần lượt hết đề này đến dề khác để thấy khả năng đọc tiến bộ rõ rệt sau mỗi đề thi reading ielts.

A Cambridge professor says that a change in drinking habits was the reason for the Industrial Revolution in Britain. Anjana Abuja reports.


A. Alan Macfarlane, professor of anthropological science at King’s College, Cambridge has, like other historians, spent decades wrestling with the enigma of the Industrial Revolution. Why did this particular Big Bang – the world-changing birth of industry - happen in Britain? And why did it strike at the end of the 18th century?

B. Macfarlane compares the puzzle to a combination lock. ‘There are about 20 different factors and all of them need to be present before the revolution can happen,’ he says. For industry to take off, there needs to be the technology and power to drive factories, large urban populations to provide cheap labour, easy transport to move goods around, an affluent middle-class willing to buy mass-produced objects, a market-driven economy and a political system that allows this to happen. While this was the case for England, other nations, such as Japan, the Netherlands and France also met some of these criteria but were not industrialising. All these factors must have been necessary. But not sufficient to cause the revolution, says Macfarlane. ‘After all, Holland had everything except coal while China also had many of these factors. Most historians are convinced there are one or two missing factors that you need to open the lock.’


C. The missing factors, he proposes, are to be found in almost even kitchen cupboard. Tea and beer, two of the nation’s favourite drinks, fuelled the revolution. The antiseptic properties of tannin, the active ingredient in tea, and of hops in beer – plus the fact that both are made with boiled water – allowed urban communities to flourish at close quarters without succumbing to water-borne diseases such as dysentery. The theory sounds eccentric but once he starts to explain the detective work that went into his deduction, the scepticism gives way to wary admiration. Macfarlanes case has been strengthened by support from notable quarters – Roy Porter, the distinguished medical historian, recently wrote a favourable appraisal of his research.

D. Macfarlane had wondered for a long time how the Industrial Revolution came about. Historians had alighted on one interesting factor around the mid-18th century that required explanation. Between about 1650 and 1740,the population in Britain was static. But then there was a burst in population growth. Macfarlane says: ‘The infant mortality rate halved in the space of 20 years, and this happened in both rural areas and cities, and across all classes. People suggested four possible causes. Was there a sudden change in the viruses and bacteria around? Unlikely. Was there a revolution in medical science? But this was a century before Lister’s revolution*. Was there a change in environmental conditions? There were improvements in agriculture that wiped out malaria, but these were small gains. Sanitation did not become widespread until the 19th century. The only option left is food. But the height and weight statistics show a decline. So the food must have got worse. Efforts to explain this sudden reduction in child deaths appeared to draw a blank .’


E. This population burst seemed to happen at just the right time to provide labour for the Industrial Revolution. ‘When you start moving towards an industrial revolution, it is economically efficient to have people living close together,’  says Macfarlane. ‘But then you get disease, particularly from human waste.’ Some digging around in historical records revealed that there was a change in the incidence of water-borne disease at that time, especially dysentery. Macfarlane deduced that whatever the British were drinking must have been important in regulating disease. He says, ‘We drank beer. For a long time, the English were protected by the strong antibacterial agent in hops, which were added to help preserve the beer. But in the late 17th century a tax was introduced on malt, the basic ingredient of beer. The poor turned to water and gin and in the 1720s the mortality rate began to rise again. Then it suddenly dropped again. What caused this?’

F. Macfarlane looked to Japan, which was also developing large cities about the same time, and also had no sanitation. Water-borne diseases had a much looser grip on the Japanese population than those in Britain. Could it be the prevalence of tea in their culture? Macfarlane then noted that the history of tea in Britain provided an extraordinary coincidence of dates. Tea was relatively expensive until Britain started a direct clipper trade with China in the early 18th century. By the 1740s, about the time that infant mortality was dipping, the drink was common. Macfarlane guessed that the fact that water had to be boiled, together with the stomach-purifying properties of tea meant that the breast milk provided by mothers was healthier than it had ever been. No other European nation sipped tea like the British, which, by Macfarlanes logic, pushed these other countries out of contention for the revolution.

G. But, if tea is a factor in the combination lock, why didn’t Japan forge ahead in a tea-soaked industrial revolution of its own? Macfarlane notes that even though 17th-century Japan had large cities, high literacy rates, even a futures market, it had turned its back on the essence of any work-based revolution by giving up labour-saving devices such as animals, afraid that they would put people out of work. So, the nation that we now think of as one of the most technologically advanced entered the 19th century having ‘abandoned the wheel’.

Questions 1-7

Reading Passage 1 has seven paragraphs, A-G. Choose the correct heading for each paragraph from the list of headings below.

Write the correct number, i-ix, in boxes 1-7 on your answer sheet.

                       List of Headings

i    The search for the reasons for an increase in population

ii    Industrialisation and the fear of unemployment

iii    The development of cities in Japan 4 The time and place of the Industrial Revolution

iv    The time and place of the Industrial Revolution

v     The cases of Holland, France and China

vi    Changes in drinking habits in Britain

vii   Two keys to Britain’s industrial revolution

viii  Conditions required for industrialisation

ix   Comparisons with Japan lead to the answer

 

1     Paragraph  A

2     Paragraph  B

3     Paragraph  C

4     Paragraph  D

5     Paragraph  E

6     Paragraph  F

7     Paragraph  G

Questions 8-13

Do the following statements agree with the information given in Reading Passage 197?

In boxes 8-13 on your answer sheet, write

TRUE    if the statement agrees with the information
FALSE   if the statement contradicts the information
NOT GIVEN if there is no information on this

8. China’s transport system was not suitable for industry in the 18th century.

9. Tea and beer both helped to prevent dysentery in Britain.

10. Roy Porter disagrees with Professor Macfarlane’s findings.

11. After 1740,there was a reduction in population in Britain.

12. People in Britain used to make beer at home.

13. The tax on malt indirectly caused a rise in the death rate.

 

Trên đây là bài đọc reading "Tea and the Industrial Revolution", hi vọng bạn làm bài thật tốt và cải thiện được khả năng từ vựng cũng như ngữ pháp để hỗ trợ nâng cao kỹ năng làm bài reading ielts của mình. Thời gian tới Native Speaker hi vọng sẽ làm thêm phần giải chi tiết, dịch toàn bài đọc đồng thời liệt kê toàn bộ từ vựng hay và khó của tất các bài reading IELTS. Mong rằng đội ngũ Native Speaker sẽ sớm hoàn thiện kế hoạch này. Chúc các bạn rèn luyện và học tập thật tốt nhé. " Practice makes perfect"

Answer:
1. iv
2. viii
3. vii
4. i
5. vi
6. ix
7. ii
8. NOT GIVEN
9. TRUE
10. FALSE
11. FALSE
12. NOT GIVEN
13. TRUE

 

Các khóa học giao tiếp

Khóa học tiếng anh giao tiếp cơ bản 1 kèm 1

Khóa học tiếng anh giao tiếp cơ bản 1 kèm 1

- Dành cho các bạn level beginer - high beginer ( tham khảo bảng cấp độ tại đây). 

Khoá Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Nâng Cao 1 kèm 1

Khoá Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Nâng Cao 1 kèm 1

Bạn có thể nghe hiểu, giao tiếp trong những tình huống quen thuộc, nhưng gặp khó khăn trong những tình huống mới, không diễn đạt ý sâu sắc và chi tiết.

Khóa Ielts Speaking Online 1 kèm 1

Khóa Ielts Speaking Online 1 kèm 1

Khóa học Ielts speaking online, hình thức học 1 kèm 1 với 100% giáo viên nước ngoài giúp cải thiện khả năng giao tiếp, làm quen với phần thi speaking. Luyện speaking theo chủ để part 1, part 2, part 3.

Khóa luyện thi Starters, Movers, Flyers, KET, PET 1 kèm 1

Khóa luyện thi Starters, Movers, Flyers, KET, PET 1 kèm 1

Khi đăng ký khóa luyện thi khóa luyện thi online Starters, Movers, Flyers, KET, PET của Native Speaker, bé sẽ được học 1 kèm 1 với giáo viên nước ngoài, học online với linh học linh hoạt từ 8-23h.

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Online Cho Trẻ Em 1 kèm 1

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Online Cho Trẻ Em  1 kèm 1

Khóa học tiếng Anh giao tiếp online qua Skype dành cho trẻ em, hình thức học 1 kèm 1 với 100% giáo viên nước ngoài giúp cải thiện khả năng nghe nói

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Văn Phòng 1 kèm 1

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Văn Phòng 1 kèm 1

Nhân viên văn phòng, sinh viên mới ra trường đi phỏng vấn, quản lý, giám đốc, chủ doanh nghiệp muốn cải thiện TA để giao tiếp trong môi trường quốc tế

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Phỏng Vấn 1 kèm 1

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Phỏng Vấn 1 kèm 1

Khóa học tiếng anh phỏng vấn xin việc cấp tốc 1 kèm 1 online.  Giới thiệu bản thân, sở thích; điểm mạnh, điểm yếu; học vấn; kinh nghiệm và mục tiêu nghề nghiệp - Nghe - hiểu câu hỏi của nhà tuyển dụng -

Khoá Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Du Lịch Cấp Tốc 1 kèm 1

Khoá Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Du Lịch Cấp Tốc 1 kèm 1

Bạn sắp đi du lịch nước ngoài, nhưng khả năng giao tiếp chưa tốt, muốn có môi trường thực hành tiếng Anh, biết cách giải quyết các tình huống, xử lý thực tế.

Khoá Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Cho Người Mất Gốc 1 kèm 1

Khoá Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Cho Người Mất Gốc 1 kèm 1

Các bạn đã từng học tiếng Anh trong nhiều năm nhưng bị gián đoạn một thời gian dài không đụng đến tiếng Anh. Kiến thức lại trở về gần như là số 0.

Khoá Học Giao Tiếp Công Tác Cấp Tốc 1 kèm 1

Khoá Học Giao Tiếp Công Tác Cấp Tốc 1 kèm 1

Khóa học cải thiện khả năng giao tiếp tiếng Anh cấp tốc, học 1 kèm 1 online với GV nước ngoài, dành cho người sắp đi công tác nước ngoài.

Khóa Tiếng Anh Cho Người Định Cư Nước Ngoài 1 kèm 1

Khóa Tiếng Anh Cho Người Định Cư Nước Ngoài 1 kèm 1

Cải thiện giao tiếp, biết cách sử dụng tiếng Anh để làm giấy tờ, thủ tục khi qua hải quan, đến sân bay nước ngoài, ở nhà hàng, khách sạn.

Khoá Học Giao Tiếp Kinh Doanh 1 kèm 1

Khoá Học Giao Tiếp Kinh Doanh 1 kèm 1

- Giám đốc, quản lý, nhân viên muốn giao tiếp tiếng Anh để thương lượng, đàm phán, họp hành.

KẾT NỐI VỚI CHÚNG TÔI

DMCA.com Protection Status