ĐỀ THI IELTS READING VÀ ĐÁP ÁN - Lost for Words

Lost for Words

Many minority languages are on the danger list.

In the Native American Navajo nation which sprawls across four states in the American south-west, the native language is dying

Thumbnail

ĐỀ THI IELTS READING VÀ ĐÁP ÁN - Lost for Words

Native Speaker - Trung tâm tiếng Anh 1 kèm 1 online qua Skype xin giới thiệu đến các bạn đề thi Ielts với tựa đề " Lost for Words" thuộc chủ đề ngôn ngữ. Native Speaker hi vọng cung cấp cho bạn thật nhiều đề luyện thi ielts reading nhằm giúp các bạn luyện tập kỹ năng đọc các vấn đề học thuật như khoa học, báo chí, thiên văn, địa lý. Chúc các bạn kiên nhẫn luyện tập lần lượt hết đề này đến dề khác để thấy khả năng đọc tiến bộ rõ rệt sau mỗi đề thi reading ielts.

Many minority languages are on the danger list.

In the Native American Navajo nation which sprawls across four states in the American south-west, the native language is dying. Most of its speakers are middle-age or elderly. Although many students take classes in Navajo, the schools are run in English. Street sign, supermarket goods and even their own newspaper are all in English. Not surprisingly, linguists doubt that any native speakers of Navajo will remain in a hundred years’ time.

Navajo is far from alone. Half the world’s 6,800 languages are likely to vanish within two generations - that’s one language lost every ten days. Never before has the planet’s linguistic diversity shrunk at such a pace. “At the moment, we are heading for about three or four languages dominating the world”, says Mark Pagel, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Reading. “It’s a mass extinction, and whether we will ever rebound from the loss is difficult to know.’

 Isolation breeds linguistic diversity as a result, the world is peppered with languages spoken by only a few people. Only 250 languages have more than a million speaker, and at least 3,000 have fewer than 2,500. It is not necessarily these small languages that are about to disappear. Navajo is considered endangered despite having 150,000 speakers. What makes a language endangered is not that the number of speakers, but how old they are. If it is spoken by children it is relatively safe. The critically endangered languages are those that are only spoken by the elderly, according to Michael Krauss, director o the Alaska Native Language Center, in Fairbanks.

Why do people reject the language of their parent? It begins with a crisis of confidence when a small community finds itself alongside a larger, wealthier society, says Nicholas Ostler of Britain’s Foundation for Endangered Languages, in Bath. ‘People lose faith in their culture’ he says. ‘When the next generation reaches their teens, they might not want to be induced into the old tradition.’

The change is not always voluntary. Quite often, governments try to kill off a minority language by banning its use in public or discouraging its use in school, all to promote national unity. The former US policy of running Indian reservation in English, for example, effectively put languages such as Navajo on the danger list. But Salikoko Mufwene, who chairs the Linguistics Department at the University of Chicago, argues that the deadliest weapon is not government policy but economic globalisation. ‘Native Americans have not lost pride in their language, but they have had to adapt to socio-economic pressures’ he says. ‘They can not refuse to speak English if most commercial activity is in English". But are languages worth saving? At the very least, there is a loss of data for the study of languages and their evolution, which relies on comparisons between languages, both living and dead. When an unwritten and unrecorded language disappears, it is lost to science.

Language is also intimately bond up with culture, so it may be difficult to reserve one without the other. ‘If a person shifts from Navajo to English, they lose something' Mufwene says. ‘Moreover, the loss of diversity may also deprive us of different ways of looking at the world’, says Pagel. There is mounting evidence that learning a language produces physiological changes in brain. ‘Your brain and mine are different from the brain of someone, who speaks French, for instance’ Pagel says, and this could affect our thoughts and perceptions. ‘The patterns and connections we make among various concepts may be structured by the linguistic habits of our community.’

So despite linguists’ best efforts, many languages will disappear over the next century. But a growing interest in cultural identity may prevent the direst predictions from coming true. ‘The key to fostering diversity is for people to learn their ancestral tongue, as well as the dominant language’ says Doug Whalen, founder and president of the Endangered Language Fund in New Haven, Connecticut. ‘Most of these languages will not survive without a large degree of bilingualism’ he says. In New Zealand, classes for children have slowed the erosion of Maori and rekindled interest in the language. A similar approach in Hawaii has produced about 8000 new speakers of Polynesian languages in the past few years. In California, ‘apprentice’ programmes have provided life support to several indigenous languages. Volunteer 'apprentices' pair up with one of the last living speakers of Native American tongue to learn a traditional skill such as basket weaving, with instruction exclusively in the endangered language. After about 300 hours of training, they are generally sufficiently fluent to transmit the language to the next generation. But Mufwene says that preventing a language dying out is not the same as giving it new life by using every day. ‘Preserving a language is more likely preserving fruits in a jar’ he says.

However, preservation can bring a language back from the dead. There are examples of languages that have survived in written form and then been revived by latter generations. But a written form is essential for this, so the mere possibility of revival has led many speakers of endangered languages to develop systems of writing where none existed before.

Question 1-4
Complete the summary below. Choose no more than two words from the passage for each answer.

Write your answers in boxes 1-4 on your answer sheet.

There are currently approximately 6,800 languages in the world. This great variety of languages came about largely as a result of geographical (1) …......... But in today’s world, factors such as government initiatives and (2) ......…....… are contributing to a huge decrease in the number of languages. One factor which may help to ensure that some endangered languages do not die out completely is people’s increasing appreciation of their (3) ......…..... This has been encouraged though programmes of languages classes for children and through ‘apprentice’ schemes, in which the endangered language is used as the medium of instruction to teach people a (4) …............ Some speakers of endangered languages have even produced writing systems in order to help secure the survival of their mother tongue.

Question 5-9
Look at the following statements (Question 5-9) and the list of people in the box below. Match each statement with the correct person A-E.

Write the appropriate letter A-E in box 5-9 on your answer sheet.

NB You may use any letter more than once.

5.   Endangered languages cannot be saved unless people learn to speak more than one language.
6.   Saving languages from extinction is not in itself a satisfactory goal.
7.   The way we think may be determined by our language.
8.   Young people often reject the established way of life in their community.
9.   A change of language may mean a loss of traditional culture.

A.   Michael Krauss
B.   Salikoko Mufwene
C.   Nicholas Ostler
D.   Mark Pagel
E.   Doug Whalen

Question 10-13
Do the following statements agree with the views of the writer in Reading Passage 140?
In boxes 10-13 on your answer sheet write:

YES                     If the statement agrees with the view of the writer
NO                      If the statement contradicts the view of writer
NOT GIVEN       If it is impossible to say what the writer thinks about this.

10. The Navajo language will die out because it currently has too few speakers.
11. A large number of native speakers fails to guarantee the survival of a language.
12. National governments could do more to protect endangered languages.
13. The loss of linguistic diversity is inevitable.

 

Trên đây là bài đọc reading "Lost for Words", hi vọng bạn làm bài thật tốt và cải thiện được khả năng từ vựng cũng như ngữ pháp để hỗ trợ nâng cao kỹ năng làm bài reading ielts của mình. Thời gian tới Native Speaker hi vọng sẽ làm thêm phần giải chi tiết, dịch toàn bài đọc đồng thời liệt kê toàn bộ từ vựng hay và khó của tất các bài reading IELTS. Mong rằng đội ngũ Native Speaker sẽ sớm hoàn thiện kế hoạch này. Chúc các bạn rèn luyện và học tập thật tốt nhé. " Practice makes perfect"

Answer:
1. isolation
2. economic globatisation/globalization /socio-economic pressures
3. cultural identity
4. traditional skill
5. E
6. B
7. D
8. C
9. B
10. No
11. YES
12. NOT GTVEN
13. YES

 

Các khóa học giao tiếp

Khóa học tiếng anh giao tiếp cơ bản 1 kèm 1

Khóa học tiếng anh giao tiếp cơ bản 1 kèm 1

- Dành cho các bạn level beginer - high beginer ( tham khảo bảng cấp độ tại đây). 

Khoá Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Nâng Cao 1 kèm 1

Khoá Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Nâng Cao 1 kèm 1

Bạn có thể nghe hiểu, giao tiếp trong những tình huống quen thuộc, nhưng gặp khó khăn trong những tình huống mới, không diễn đạt ý sâu sắc và chi tiết.

Khóa Ielts Speaking Online 1 kèm 1

Khóa Ielts Speaking Online 1 kèm 1

Khóa học Ielts speaking online, hình thức học 1 kèm 1 với 100% giáo viên nước ngoài giúp cải thiện khả năng giao tiếp, làm quen với phần thi speaking. Luyện speaking theo chủ để part 1, part 2, part 3.

Khóa luyện thi Starters, Movers, Flyers, KET, PET 1 kèm 1

Khóa luyện thi Starters, Movers, Flyers, KET, PET 1 kèm 1

Khi đăng ký khóa luyện thi khóa luyện thi online Starters, Movers, Flyers, KET, PET của Native Speaker, bé sẽ được học 1 kèm 1 với giáo viên nước ngoài, học online với linh học linh hoạt từ 8-23h.

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Online Cho Trẻ Em 1 kèm 1

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Online Cho Trẻ Em  1 kèm 1

Khóa học tiếng Anh giao tiếp online qua Skype dành cho trẻ em, hình thức học 1 kèm 1 với 100% giáo viên nước ngoài giúp cải thiện khả năng nghe nói

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Văn Phòng 1 kèm 1

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Văn Phòng 1 kèm 1

Nhân viên văn phòng, sinh viên mới ra trường đi phỏng vấn, quản lý, giám đốc, chủ doanh nghiệp muốn cải thiện TA để giao tiếp trong môi trường quốc tế

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Phỏng Vấn 1 kèm 1

Khóa Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Phỏng Vấn 1 kèm 1

Khóa học tiếng anh phỏng vấn xin việc cấp tốc 1 kèm 1 online.  Giới thiệu bản thân, sở thích; điểm mạnh, điểm yếu; học vấn; kinh nghiệm và mục tiêu nghề nghiệp - Nghe - hiểu câu hỏi của nhà tuyển dụng -

Khoá Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Du Lịch Cấp Tốc 1 kèm 1

Khoá Học Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Du Lịch Cấp Tốc 1 kèm 1

Bạn sắp đi du lịch nước ngoài, nhưng khả năng giao tiếp chưa tốt, muốn có môi trường thực hành tiếng Anh, biết cách giải quyết các tình huống, xử lý thực tế.

Khoá Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Cho Người Mất Gốc 1 kèm 1

Khoá Tiếng Anh Giao Tiếp Cho Người Mất Gốc 1 kèm 1

Các bạn đã từng học tiếng Anh trong nhiều năm nhưng bị gián đoạn một thời gian dài không đụng đến tiếng Anh. Kiến thức lại trở về gần như là số 0.

Khoá Học Giao Tiếp Công Tác Cấp Tốc 1 kèm 1

Khoá Học Giao Tiếp Công Tác Cấp Tốc 1 kèm 1

Khóa học cải thiện khả năng giao tiếp tiếng Anh cấp tốc, học 1 kèm 1 online với GV nước ngoài, dành cho người sắp đi công tác nước ngoài.

Khóa Tiếng Anh Cho Người Định Cư Nước Ngoài 1 kèm 1

Khóa Tiếng Anh Cho Người Định Cư Nước Ngoài 1 kèm 1

Cải thiện giao tiếp, biết cách sử dụng tiếng Anh để làm giấy tờ, thủ tục khi qua hải quan, đến sân bay nước ngoài, ở nhà hàng, khách sạn.

Khoá Học Giao Tiếp Kinh Doanh 1 kèm 1

Khoá Học Giao Tiếp Kinh Doanh 1 kèm 1

- Giám đốc, quản lý, nhân viên muốn giao tiếp tiếng Anh để thương lượng, đàm phán, họp hành.

KẾT NỐI VỚI CHÚNG TÔI

DMCA.com Protection Status